Book Review · Books

The Only Skill That Matters

Do you crave to learn more in less time? The Only Skill That Matters tackles ways in which we can learn quicker, easier and have fun doing it. Super learner author, Jonathan Levi provides different ways we can help make recalling material in a fun way. Some examples he provides are to assign an image that will help you remember a piece of information you are learning. Another example he gives is if you are wanting to learn a tough subject to use a variety of learning means: books, podcasts, documentaries, etc. Mr. Levi also, talks about how we can speed read. Since I love to read this is a skill my ears perked up on. I’ve never thought of previewing something I’m going to read before I read it. There are many other examples the author provides.

This book may be super short, but the contents may take a few rereads to have this helpful information sink in. I’m still marinating the information I’ve read. This book was easy to read, challenging to comprehend some of the skills shared and gives me hope to know I can learn quicker implementing the skills shared.

I received my complimentary copy of The Only Skill That Matters by Jonathan A. Levi from Lioncrest Publishing, care of TLC Book Tours. The views expressed are of my own accord and mine. To purchase a copy click here for Amazon and to connect with Mr. Levi check out his website.

Book Review · Books

Find Your Mantra

Positive thinking can seem a tad woo woo, but is being grumpy really going to change your life for the better? This short little book of mantras are a bit stereotypical, but there are grains of truth in this book. The chapters are broken up by different themes like love, peace, etc. There are gorgeous illustrations and photos throughout this beautiful book.

I’ve always been mainly a positive and upbeat person. I do have my own don’t want to adult moments. Can I just get paid to read books and review? This little book will help remind you that you do matter and that with diligence we can accomplish so much with our life. It’s not about keeping up with the Jone’s, but staying in the moment good times, or bad and being thankful we get to experience our unique life.

I received my complimentary digital copy of Find Your Mantra by Aysel Gunar from Quarto Publishing Group, care of NetGalley. The views are mine and of my own choice. If you like inspirational books then you just might want to add this title to your library.

Book Review · Books

The Transformation

Everyone deals with some kind of trauma in their life. No matter how large, or small all types of trauma are valid. The Transformation by James Gordon, MD is a book about ways we can tackle our trauma in healthy, creative, engaging ways.

Some examples provided in this book are:

Drawing a picture of how you see yourself now, then drawing how you see yourself with your current challenge, and finally drawing a picture of what you’ll look like once that challenge is resolved. I’m not the greatest artist, but I love to doodle and I think this is a great way to visualize how we see our trauma and how we can unearth a solution by being artistic.

Dancing and shaking stress off. I am not a dancer. I have to two left feet and always feel weird dancing in front of people. I believe this idea could help us get exercise, allow ourselves to be silly and literally shake away our trauma.

Visualization can sound woo woo. This example is a way for you to discover your place that you feel safe at/in. I recall doing a visualization exercise in around 1st grade. It does take some decent imagination, but as an adult I have visualized I was laying in a warm bath and it helped me relax so I could fall asleep at night.

Finding your guide to give you guidance. This idea is one I’m personally not comfortable with.

Be part of a healing circle or group. This suggestion made me think of going to PFLAG, which is similarly run. It’s confidential and laid out in a similar way where you can share if you want to, but not required and there’s no pressure to.

Creating a genogram. To me a genogram is like a family tree that you detail with personal information about who you are able to, to see any generational themes. I think this example is fascinating as it helps us see how our ancestor’s choices affected our lives today.

There are other great examples, but I want you to be inspired to read the whole book. I am glad I read this book. It’s not long in length, but thick in information. I would recommend reading it with a highlighter and note tabs because there is a lot to absorb. I received my complimentary copy of The Transformation by James Gordon, MD from Harper One, care of FSB Associates. The views are mine and of my own will.

Book Review · Books

Women Of Spirit: Volume 2

I’ve read many inspirational books about women who have overcome hardships, but Women Of Spirit takes the top spot. This book is a collection of memoir vignettes that share stories of overcoming varieties of life challenges from abusive upbringings, bad relationships, career hardships, to the death of loved ones and many other types of challenges. Each memoir is unique with an author photo before the vignette. This collection is comprised of and by ladies from the UK.

I received my complimentary digital copy of Women Of Spirit: Volume 2 by Susie MacKie from NetGalley. The views expressed are mine and of my own will. If you need a book that will not just inspire, but convict to keep pressing on when life is horrendous, then this book is a life saver. I hope that there will be further volumes of Women Of Spirit, like a USA edition, a South American edition, etc. No matter where you reside this book will be relatable on many levels.

Book Review · Books

Saved As Draft

I have loved to write since I was little. I’d write out short stories and draw pictures. In junior high I kept a diary and in high school. I am grieved I chucked those personal histories. All because they were triggers regarding ex boyfriends. Diaries are moments captured in real time. I wish I had kept them, so that I’d have that unique history to look back on.

N.D. Chan wrote Saved As Draft to show that even emails we may not send, letters we write, but chicken out to mail are still our written history and important to keep. Her memoir is her collection of such writings that follow her journey from living in China with her grandparents to moving to the USA to live with her mom and stepdad. N.D. shares her exploration to find out more about the dad she never knew. She also, dives into what first crushes and relationships are like when you’re a teenager. The author discusses what it was like to try to meet other ladies who are into ladies in a time when it wasn’t as safe to be out as it is now. N.D. also, includes poems.

This memoir is short, but filled with so much heart. I felt sucked right in from the start. As a little kid a lot of the time at a new school I felt like the odd man out. Being super short is not cute when the older kids find it humorous to pick you up and not put you down and being mistaken for a Kindergartner in the third grade. I know what it’s like to not understand why our parents may choose to do what they do. N.D. struggles wondering why her mom decided to wait so long to have her move to the USA to be with her. I have a lot of memories of having crushes on both girls and boys growing up. I remember just staring at one poor boy in the first grade relentlessly during the time we’d have to put our heads down for quiet time.

I received a complimentary digital copy of Saved As Draft by N.D. Chan from NetGalley. The views are my own and of my own will. I loved this book and hope there will be more books from this author. Some authors you read and sense they are a kindred spirit. Thank you N.D. for sharing your beautiful soul with the world. Keep on. writing.

Book Review · Books

Happy Money

Do books about money make you want to take a nap? Do they bore you to tears? This short yellow book with the smile on the cover will keep you turning pages to the very end. I’m not into reading finance books. It’s a rare occurrence, but the title Happy Money sounded like a happy book, so why not try it?

I dove in and wondered what financial gems I would find. This book isn’t about numbers. This book is about how our views about money help shape how it effects our lives.

It shares the different types of views we can have and what type of emotions the topic of money can bring up for us. This is fascinating because you don’t necessarily put two and together. I know I didn’t before I read this book. I learned a lot about myself.

Another topic that comes up in this helpful book is how important relationships in our lives are in regards to money. I don’t mean merely asking someone to help you out with EOC, but how having people in our lives that we can trust to help us out (not just fiscally) is imperative. If we had a big groups of friends and family to help us when life turns ugly we wouldn’t be stressing about how much we have in our bank accounts. Not that it gives you a license to mooch off others.

Lastly, the biggest message I took away from this book is how vital thankfulness is in our lives. Being thankful for small things helps gives us room to receive and be thankful for even bigger things. We really don’t need all the bells and whistles that commercialism throws at us on the TV, radio and social media. What do we truly need to be happy? We all have our own scale of what we feel will make us happy. This book made me rethink what I truly need to make me happy.

I received a complimentary physical and digital copy of Happy Money by Ken Honda from NetGalley, care of FSB Associates. The views expressed are of my own accord and my own. This book I believe will become a classic. It’s motivational, educational, and challenging. It’s a keeper.

Book Review · Books

Trailer Trash: An 80’s Memoir

I grew up in the 80’s. I get nostalgic when I hear songs from the 80’s because then I think of the show “Kids Inc,” that was on Disney. I was so in love with that show my aunt found out how I could get free tickets and just had to bring ten friends. That was the day my fascination with Hollywood got dumped real quick. I digress though. When I saw Booktasters was looking for reviewers for Trailer Trash: An 80’s Memoir, I thought it sounded fascinating and who can say, “No,” to going down memory lane?

Angie grew up in a trailer park. Her parent’s owned and managed one, so that was her community and social circle. I’ve never lived in a trailer park, but Angie brings to life what it’s like. There are stereotypes about trailer parks and Angie gives you the honest peek into what life what like growing up in one. The descriptions of her neighbors are hilarious and candid. She touches on the topic of alcoholism and how her mother’s drinking affected her and her siblings. The pet chapter is classic and brings to mind how many assortment of pets kids go through going up. She also, describes the classic moments from childhood like skating at the roller rink on the weekends, getting to experience SlipNSlide and many other 80’s references.

I received a complimentary digital copy of Trailer Trash: An 80’s Memoir by Angie Cavallari from the author via Booktasters. The views expressed are mine and my own. If you also, are an 80’s kid then you’ll appreciate every page of this book. I laughed, teared up and cheered for Angie. Thank you Angie for allowing me to read your deeply personal story. I hope anyone who loves memoirs will give this book a chance. Trailer parks are definitely their own little communities filled with laughter, beer, fights and don’t forget the cops.