Book Review · Books

Death Is But A Dream

First off the cover is unique. It makes me think of an old school composition notebook with the style of binding. The colors on the cover are vibrant. The topic of this slim volume is one we like to avoid: death. Not just death, but our dreams we have before we pass on.

Dr. Kerr is a doctor at Hospice Buffalo. He wanted to give a voice to those in the process of dying, to have these patient’s voices be heard fully. He shared cases of all different types of patients from children, to couples, to those with a rough and tumble past, as well as mentally/physically challenged. He wanted to share what type of dreams they are having and how these dreams helped the patient graduate towards accepting that they were going to pass.

If you are into dreams then this book may be of interest. Dr. Kerr wasn’t looking to interpret these patients dreams, but to see how they helped each patient in having resolution.

I think each patient who graciously allowed themselves to be interviewed was fascinating, insightful and comforting. How can dreams before death be of comfort? I think Dr. Kerr noticed a pattern how the person’s dreams helped the person come full circle regarding their life.

I received my complimentary copy of Death Is But A Dream by Christopher Kerr from Avery, care of FSB Associates. The views are mine and of my own choice. This book was hard to put down. Even though the topic we all have to face some day isn’t easy, this book I think is a great conversation starter and after finishing it I actually feel more comfortable with the topic. We don’t get to choose if our passing will be sudden or gradual, hence why we have to be spiritually prepared at all times.

Book Review · Books

Dark Blossom

Cynthia is a therapist whose still putting her and her daughter, Lily’s life back together after her divorce. When a new client named Sam comes in for his appointment, Cynthia has no idea how this man’s story might affect her own life. Sam is reeling from the sudden passing of his wife and young teenage son, William.

Lily is a teen going through her punk phase and not too, thrilled with her mother. No matter how much Cynthia tries to open up to her daughter regarding the divorce Lily just keeps shutting her out.

When Lily and Sam meet it seems they are strangely two peas in a pod, which weirds out Cynthia. Sam seems to be good at talking with Lily, which Cynthia has been attempting to for months. When Lily and Sam mention they both have secrets, Cynthia wonders just what kind of secrets they are.

I received my complimentary digital copy of Dark Blossom by Neel Mullick from Rupa Publications, care of NetGalley. The views expressed are my own. This debut novel had me hooked. I love how Cynthia has a special journal for each of her clients. That one detail as a journal addict connected with me. The characterization of Cynthia, Sam and Lily is so realistic that I wish they were real people. This is a novel that will stay with you long after the final page.

Book Review · Books

Modern Loss

Modern Loss by Rebecca Soffer And Gabrielle Birkner is a tour de force on the topic of ways in which we deal with the loss of a loved one. Or even the loss of someone we may not be particularly fond of. Both authors experienced the loss of one or both their parents at an age they never expected to. These ladies decided to create an online community where people can be honest in sharing their grief. Modern Loss is a collection of personal essays written by many of the members of their website. Each essay is unique and powerful. The book is broken up into different things we deal with when it comes to loosing someone: the aftermath, what things trigger us in remembering the person, how do we address intimacy if it was our spouse/partner, and many other pertinent topics.

I received Modern Loss from TLC Book Tours care of Harper Wave in exchange for my feedback. This book is helpful in seeing the many facets of dealing with a loss and seeing it from many different perspectives. These essays were at times gut wrenching, humorous and thought provoking. I highly recommend this book.