Book Review · Books

Happiness Is All We Want

What do you think makes us happy? Is it our relationships, our jobs, our faith, our looks, our belongings? Author, Ashutosh Mishra takes this time old question and gives a very in depth answer in his book, Happiness Is All We Want. Mr. Mishra breaks it down by categories like health, relationships, spirituality and more. He explains how we have used relationships, careers and belongings as the end all, be all that will make us happy when any of those options can be gone in a blink of an eye.

This book gives a lot of food for thought. The section on exercise is very convicting and the part that talks about the effects on everything becoming digital is disturbing. As for the yoga section I’m not quite there, or meditation, but it was interesting to read about the different types of yoga.

I received a complimentary copy of Happiness Is All We Want by Ashutosh Mishra from the author. The views are strictly mine and provided of my own accord. This book was so in depth it took me some time to read, but you do want to take your time since there is a lot of information provided.

Book Review · Books

Quaker Quicks: What Do Quakers Believe

Have you ever been to a Quaker meeting? I have a few years ago. It was the most uncomfortable hour of my life. Everyone sits in silence unless someone feels lead to share something. When I saw this Quaker Quicks book available to review I couldn’t help, but request it to find out more.

This short book provides a few basics about what Quakers are all about. Interesting things I learned about them is that they don’t have creeds, or a governing church body. I discovered they handle their meetings to make decisions just like they do their church meetings. In silence. I found out they utilize different spiritual books to educate and don’t favor one holy book over another, though most do have the Bible on their table that’s in the center of the group whose meeting together. This book also, quotes a number of different Quakers regarding how being a Quaker has changed their life.

After reading this short book I want to read more. Each Quaker group are independent of others and they each have their own magazines and books they publish. There are some aspects of Quakers that bring to mind Unitarians.

I received my digital copy of Quaker Quicks: What Do Quakers Believe by Geoffrey Durham care of NetGalley from John Hunt Publishing and Alternative Christian. The views expressed are mine. If you want to read more about what Quakers believe I highly recommend this book. This author has other books in this series about other aspects of the Quaker faith. It’s readable, fascinating and most of all enjoyable.

Book Review · Books

Simplify Your Life

If you need a book to kick your life into gear, then I highly endorse Simplify Your Life. This book is very short, but worth every page. Sarah talks about a wide range of topics from having us pinpoint what our values are, to who we keep in our inner circle, to seeing ways you can enrich your life.

I thought I’d give you a sample of some of my own personal answers while reading this gem are:

Keep an envy journal – write down things you are envious of to figure out what you truly want in your life and what kind of person you wish to be.

Top 10 values: honesty, patience, authenticity, compassion, humor, justice, love, loyalty, spirituality, trustworthiness

Top 5 values: authenticity, trustworthiness, love, humor, stability

Top 5 strengths: love, humor, kindness, appreciation of beauty and excellence

My top 5 passions: writing, reading, Poland, photography, documentaries

Top 5 missing things: spiritual community, affection from family, exercise, balance, consistency

My 10 positive qualities:

patient, affectionate, considerate, loving, loyal, thoughtful, cheerful, trusting, helpful, polite

My tribe:

Family: mom, dad, brother, sister, bro-in-law, sis-in-law, nephews

Relationships: LP

Career: E, J, H, D, T, M, I, K, S, C, D, N, B, G

Well-being: πŸŒ²β˜•οΈ πŸ›πŸ₯ž πŸ“šπŸ’‘ πŸ‘­πŸŒ§ πŸ€Έβ€β™‚οΈπŸ”πŸ’»πŸ“±πŸ›πŸ“¬πŸ§»πŸ–ŠπŸ““β€οΈπŸš­βœοΈ

Personal development: too, many to list

Fun time: HG, JD, Mom, Dad

Spirituality: SP, BL

Top 5 Friends: JD, HK, BL, Owl, KM

Next 10 friends: HP, AR, AL, WildS, SP, CS, OW, SH, HG, E

Environment:

Safety & security – I feel most safe at home.

Physical comfort – I am most comfortable in jeans or sweats and a comfortable t-shirt. I don’t like the weather too, hot, but I’m not a fan of snow. I crave being around trees.

Psychological impact – I do best in a nurturing, caring environment. I detest conflict. I don’t do well being micromanaged.

I received my complimentary digital copy of Simplify Your Life by Sarah O’Flaherty from NetGalley. The views expressed are my own. I definitely want to purchase a physical copy of this book so I can notate a bunch and reference it often. I will be checking out Sarah’s other helpful titles.

Book Review · Books

The Happiness Diary

If you love purchasing diaries then I recommend The Happiness Diary. The artwork in this diary will have you turning each page with delight. There are a variety of ways you can journal: making a list of what makes you happy, drawing, free flow writing, focusing on helping others, mindfulness and learning how to be fully present.

I received my complimentary digital copy of The Happiness Diary by Barbara Ann Kipfer from NetGalley. The views expressed are mine. This diary is gorgeous and inspires you to want to do the prompts throughout the diary. I would definitely gift this to a friend.

Book Review · Books

Hello Stranger

What would life be like growing up in the 60’s being Autistic and not knowing it till you are an adult? Barbara Moran writes about going through this in her memoir, Hello Stranger. Barbara was a unique child who found she didn’t quite bond with other humans, but found she grew attached to every day objects and had a very low tolerance for noise. Her family tried to help her, but as a little kid they decided to have her live at institution.

This institution was where Barbara could live and get the help she needed. The only problem is it didn’t seem like those who were there to help fully cared. Barbara tried her best to act what is considered normal, but felt she couldn’t fully be herself. Would she ever be allowed to go back home?

Instead of getting to return home to her family she is placed in a foster home where she is merely tolerated. Barbara just wants a life of her own, to not have to walk on egg shells around others.

As an adult Barbara is finally given a name for her struggles. Autistic. When she realizes there are others who have similar struggles with noise sensitivity, repetitive thoughts, etc. she finally knows she is not alone.

One thing that brings Barbara joy is drawing. Some favorite things she loves to draw are traffic lights, church buildings, airplanes, etc. Drawing has helped her express herself.

I received my complimentary copy of Hello Stranger by Barbara Moran with Karl Williams from KiCam Projects. The views expressed are mine. This memoir was outside my comfort zone. I can’t imagine my family making such a heart breaking decision to place me in an institution, to be at the mercy of doctors and staff. Barbara is a brave woman who endured so much before being diagnosed as an adult. I’m so glad her drawing brings her comfort and joy. If you want to expand your knowledge of Autism then I do recommend this memoir. I learned new things about Autism.

Book Review · Books

The Book Of No Worries

When I was in junior high we had the classic book by Dr. James Dobson, Preparing For Adolescence. I recall it being an awkward book to read. When you are in junior high reading about bodily changes is cringe worthy. When I saw the book, The Book Of No Worries, I wondered how a similar book would be now that it’s 2019 and not 1990? This book covers a similar range of topics, including modern ones like social media, sexting, the morning after pill, LGBTQA and more.

It boggles my mind that a junior higher nowadays would have to be told about the morning after pill and sexting. When I was in junior high a cell phone was a foreign concept, contraception at that age unthinkable and sexting was not even a blip on our radar. I don’t know that these topics are appropriate for the age group intended. Yes, kids get provided more adult information earlier on, but that doesn’t mean they are mature enough to handle it. As for the topic of sexuality I do wish more had been explained around that age. When you are in the bubble of social heterosexuality, the idea of their being alternatives is a foreign concept. This book was informative and very thorough. I don’t think if I had a preteen that I’d give them this book necessarily.

I received my complimentary digital copy of The Book Of No Worries by Lizzie Cox via NetGalley. The views expressed are my own. I think it’s interesting to see the modern topics discussed in this book. If you want to see how much the world has changed this book will will open your eyes.

Book Review · Books

Small Town Hearts

Babe thought she had her whole summer ahead of her after high school with her two best friends Chad and Penny. When Penny dumps Chad, making Babe do the break up dirty work, she realizes she’s possibly loosing both of her best friends. Babe is still recouping from the fall out of her past relationship with Elodie. It was her first relationship with a woman and she is over keeping being Bi a secret. When Levi walks into Busy’s she can’t deny the attraction she feels towards him. As Levi and Babe become friends her world is thrown for a loop when Elodie reappears for the summer and seems to be cozying up to Levi. Will Babe be able to reconcile her feelings?

This novel covers the topics of friendship, sexuality, contentment and love. The characterization is well done, the description of Maine is breathtaking and the story keeps you wanting more.

I received a complimentary digital copy of Small Town Hearts by Lillie Vale courtesy of the author via NetGalley. The views expressed are mine. If you love YA and romance then this novel will be the perfect spring read. This story was sweet and the descriptions of Maine made me want to book a flight.