Book Review · Books

Missing by Cornelia Spelman

Memoirs are my favorite. They are a sneak peek into someone’s life. Missing is a short memoir of the author, Cornelia’s journey to understand her family’s dynamics, both her mother and father’s lives, as well as her eldest brother’s.

Family dynamics can be and get messy. Cornelia decides to investigate further after her elderly mother has passed, of her past claim that her son had attempted to do her in. Was it paranoia talking or was there some truth? Through researching her mother’s health history Cornelia starts to unearth more about her mother and her mother’s life.

There’s something that draws me to the Great Depression era. The author graciously included family photos and documents throughout her memoir. Getting to see old pictures of her parents lounging in their classic chairs felt like I got to step back in time for just a moment; to get to join them in their living room to curl up and read along side them. The photo exhibits warmth and coziness which is something in today’s society I believe is a lost art form.

This memoir made think of how much we truly don’t know our parents or extended family. Not everyone feels comfortable talking about their childhood or young adult years. Sometimes life is too painful. How many of us can say we know what our parent’s favorite color was as a child or what they wanted to be when they grew up? I know I sure don’t know either of those answers personally and that is sad. Our family history is aging moment by moment and if we don’t listen to those old stories and jot them down or record them then all that history goes to the grave.

I received a complimentary digital copy of Missing by Cornelia Spelman from Laura Marie PR in exchange for my honest feedback. All views expressed are my own and of my own choice. If you enjoy memoirs and family histories I think you will thoughtfully enjoy this book.

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